Healthy treats your dogs will love

Having been afraid of them for most of my life, I can’t say I ever wanted a dog. The fear stemmed from a traumatic childhood experience.

My best friend lived close to my house. Once we reached third grade, we were allowed to walk 10 minutes to and from school together, unsupervised. One afternoon, we were only five blocks from our house when we came across a dog horse (actually a German Shepherd), wandering the neighborhood wild and unaccompanied. He chased us almost the rest of the way back, at one point knocked me down. A neighbor, hearing our frantic screams, rushed outside to get rid of the dog.

Fast forward to me in my 20s and 30s, and most of my friends had dogs. I was compulsorily petting them, praying the dogs wouldn’t lick me, bite me, sniff me, chase me, or jump on me. During my visit, most of my friends went so far as to put their dogs in a room.

How sad?

Once I hit my 40s, living alone and having been burglarized, having a dog in my life started to seem like a good idea. It took me two years of attending adoption events and countless visits to the Humane Society to find a good fit. I’m happy to say I’ve had an American Cocker Spaniel for 12 years, and I can’t imagine my life any other way.

I no longer rush the other way when I see a Pit Bull, German Shepherd, or Great Dane heading in my direction. Instead, I walk confidently towards them, accepting their curious requests if they so choose or ignoring them altogether if they’re distant.

Starbuck taught me that.

She greets everyone equally and enthusiastically on our walks. When we’re home, she keeps the house tight against strangers, giving people she doesn’t know a warning and smothering them with kisses if I invite them in.

Before her amputation last December, every time I left the house she would jump on the couch and sit at the window watching me walk to my car. She was cradling her head in her little paws, my heart breaking at the sight of those “puppy eyes” watching me leave her. Yet now, like then, even as I walk through the front door, she’s standing, her tail knot wagging frantically. And just like that, I’m forgiven for leaving her home alone.

She likes. I mean, all of being, down to its depths, love. She plays with abandon. Before she became a tripod, she chased me around the house, eagerly waiting for me to turn the tables and chase her. She has to sniff, taste, lick and explore every new object brought into our home. Above all, she approaches each new experience as an adventure.

Every night she walks over to my bed and cuddles or bombards me with kisses, indicating that it’s time for her nightly Greenie dental stick. If she falls asleep next to me, I feel her kicking me in the middle of the night as she dreams, her legs moving rapidly through the air and a faint cry or growl emanating from deep within. her, making me wonder what she’s dreaming.

As I walk around the house, straightening her dog beds (she has one in every room), I marvel at the joy this little dog has brought into my life.

I wouldn’t change that for the world.

Gluten Free Pumpkin Peanut Butter Dog Biscuits

I make my oatmeal by grinding oats the old fashioned way in my NutriBullet; commercially ground is readily available at most grocery stores. Chickpea flour (aka, chickpea flour, garbanzo flour, or besan flour) is gluten-free, just like oatmeal, and is also a good source of protein. I buy it at the Mid-East Market in City Heights. There are two types of cinnamon: cassia and Ceylon. The generically labeled “ground cinnamon” is cassia. It contains high levels of the compound coumarin and is best NOT given to dogs. Ceylon cinnamon, also known as “true cinnamon” (like Mexican canela), in small doses is not only safe but, according to Dogs Naturally magazine, can help maintain a healthy weight and relieve headaches. arthritis symptoms. Pumpkin is excellent for digestion. Canned foods are excellent not only for their convenience, but also for their higher fiber content. Be sure to buy pure pumpkin puree and not pumpkin pie filling, which contains ingredients that are harmful to Fido. I suggest natural peanut butter with no added salt, oils or sugar. I buy it fresh ground at my local health food store. The yield of this recipe and Woofy Biscuits varies depending on the size of the cookie cutters. Expect 20 to 24.

2½ cups oatmeal plus more for rolling
1 cup chickpea flour
1 teaspoon ground Ceylon cinnamon
⅔ cup pumpkin puree
⅓ cup natural peanut butter
2 eggs

Place two oven racks on the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Line two rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. Put aside.

Whisk together the flours and cinnamon in a large mixing bowl. Place the pumpkin, peanut butter and eggs in a second bowl and use a wooden spoon to stir vigorously, mixing well. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix well to incorporate.

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead to form a ball. Divide the dough in half and form two balls. Flour your rolling pin and roll out a ball of dough to about ¼ inch thick. If the dough is still a bit sticky, you may need to flour your pin often to keep it from sticking. Dip your cookie cutter in a little oatmeal, shaking off the excess. Press the knife firmly into the dough. Place the cookie on your baking sheet. Repeat until all the dough is rolled, cut and on the sheets. Depending on the size of your cookie cutter, you should be able to fit 12 cookies on each baking sheet, with the cookies spaced ¼ inch apart. To keep the cookies flat while baking, prick the center once with a floured fork.

For a semi-soft cookie, bake for 25 minutes. For a harder, crispier cookie, bake an additional 10 minutes.

Storage: Softer cookies can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 3-5 days, depending on how warm your home is. Store cookies that won’t be eaten right away in the fridge for up to 10 days. Freeze for up to 3 months. Harder cookies can stay at room temperature for 2 weeks, in the fridge for a month and in the freezer for 6 months. If freezing, be sure to thaw completely before feeding.

Depending on the size of your cutter, you should be able to get at least 20 Woofy Biscuits.

(Anita L. Arambula/Confessions of a Foodie)

Woofy Cookies

Powdered milk adds bulk and protein; fat free is best. Olive oil, in moderation, is excellent for healthy skin and a shiny coat. Be sure to use only cold pressed extra virgin. Baby foods should not contain added salt, fat or onion flavorings. I like the Beech-Nut 2 Ingredient Beef and Beef Broth.

2 cups oatmeal, plus more for rolling
¾ cup rolled oats
½ cup skimmed milk powder
1 egg, beaten
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup no salt added chicken or beef broth or water
5 to 6 ounces baby meat puree (about 2 jars)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Mix all ingredients in a large bowl until a paste forms. Turn out onto a lightly floured work surface, kneading until the dough is smooth and holds together.

Sprinkle a little flour over the dough and the rolling pin. Roll out the dough to about ½ inch thick. Use a cookie cutter to shape the cookies and place them on the prepared cookie sheet. Bake them 20 minutes for a softer cookie and 30 minutes for a crispier, drier cookie. Cool on racks.

Storage: Softer cookies can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 3-5 days, depending on how warm your home is. Store cookies that won’t be eaten right away in the fridge for up to 10 days. Freeze for up to 3 months. Harder cookies can stay at room temperature for 2 weeks, in the fridge for a month and in the freezer for 6 months. If freezing, be sure to thaw completely before feeding.

Recipes are copyrighted by Anita L. Arambula and are reproduced with permission from “Confessions of a Foodie”.

Arambula is the artistic director and designer of the food section. She blogs at confessionsofafoodie.me, where the original versions of this article were published. Follow her on Instagram: @afotogirl. She can be contacted at [email protected]

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